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Plants and Pets: Know the Risks

As gardening season is underway, it is important to consider the safety of your pets when choosing your landscape.  Sometimes the Curious Cat or Dog Detective get to investigating their turf and the outcome is not always rosy.  Here is a list of plants that can be poisonous to your dog or cat:


Crocus
Azaleas
Cyclamen
Kalanchoe
Lilies
Oleander
Dieffenbachia
Daffodils
Lily of the Valley
Sago Palm
Tulips
Hyacinth

Please note that these are all very common and popular outdoor plants.  Chances are, you may already have some of these in your backyard.  Some of the side effects of ingesting poisonous plants are excessive drooling, kidney failure, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach damage and in some cases, death.  Please be sure to do your research before planting any new landscaping.  Know what is already existing in your yard before you bring a new little furry member home to the family.

Reference

Pet Poison Helpline. (n.d.). Top 10 Plants Poisonous to Pets. Retrieved June 18, 2018, from petpoisonhelpline.com: http://www.petpoisonhelpline.com/pet-owners/basics/top-10-plants-poisonous-to-pets/

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Protect Your Dog from the Summer Heat

Summer is a great time for a dog and its owner.  Walks, beach runs, swimming, slobbery car rides with the window down—all fun times for our furry BFF.  Summer is here and outdoor temperatures have already hit record highs.  Just as we take measures to stay cool during the hot months, it is equally important to keep our pets cool as well.  Dogs can become overheated quickly and sometimes without much warning.  Here are some signs of overheating to watch for as you partake in summer festivities:

?  Heavy and/or Excessive Panting
?  Increased pulse
?  Drooling
?  Lethargy
?  Diarrhea
?  Pale, dry gums
?  Glassy eyes
?  Vomiting
?  Staggering
?  Weakness

Any of these symptoms or a combination of means trouble for your dog.  Bring them indoors immediately and give them cold water.  Wiping their torso down with a cool towel can help decrease their body temperature.  As always, use your best judgment and take your dog to the nearest vet if they do not show immediate signs of improvement.

Taking precautionary steps to keep your dog cool is essential to prevent overheating.  Do not leave dogs in a hot car under any circumstances.  Be sure your dog has access to a shady, cooler space outdoors and provide access to water in that area.  Be extra attentive to older dogs and those with special needs as they can be more susceptible to problems resulting from weather changes.  Lastly, be aware of taking pups for walks on hot pavement.  A good rule of paw:  if the pavement is too hot for your bare feet, it is too hot for your dog as well.

Reference:

N., K. (2018). Dog Overheating Symptoms, Risk Factors and What to do to Cool Overheated Dogs. Retrieved June 8, 2018, from Dogs, Cats, Pets: http://www.dogscatspets.org/dogs/dog-overheating/dog-overheating-symptoms-risk-factors-cool-overheated-dogs/